Seed Stitch Knitting Tutorial

The seed stitch is one of my favourite knitting stitches. It creates a textured fabric that resembles scattered seeds. Making the stitch is very simple. All you need to do is alternate between single knit and purl stitches, both vertically and horizontally.

If you are looking for an easy stitch that will add a lot of texture to your projects, you will love the seed knitting stitch. It is one of the easiest textured knitting stitches you will ever learn.

Below I will walk you through creating the seed knitting stitch with my step-by-step tutorial. It is super simple to make. All you need to know is how to knit and purl.

What Is the Seed Stitch?

The seed knit stitch is a common stitch you will find in a lot of patterns. It is an easy stitch that creates a reversible fabric that looks the same on both sides. The alternating knit and purl stitches create tiny bumps that resemble seeds.

You can use the seedknit stitch is a great stitch to use when creating borders. The stitch lies flat, so, it will reduce the edge curling created by other types of stitches.

When is the Seed Knit Stitch Used?

The seed knitting stitch can be found in a wide variety of projects. The texture it creates can add a lot of visual interest to your projects.

The seed knitting stitch is often used when making:

  • Cardigans
  • Shawls
  • Blankets
  • Scarves
  • Cowls
  • Hats
  • Headbands
  • Dishcloths
  • and More

How to Make Seed Stitch

Easy Step-by-Step Seed Stitch Knitting Instructions

If you know how to knit and purl, you can make the seed knit stitch. The most important thing you need to remember is to alternate between the two stitches.

Follow the step-by-step instructions below to learn how to make seed knit stitch:

1.    Make a slip knot. This will be your first stitch.

2.    Cast on any number of stitches you desire, ending with an odd number.

3.    Turn your work.

4.    Knit 1.

5.    Bring your yarn up front and purl 1.

6.    Repeat steps 4-5 until you reach the end of the row.

7.    Continue repeating steps 3-6 until your fabric has reached the desired length.

Tips for Making the Seed Knit Stitch

The seed knitting stitch is a very easy stitch to master. But you may come across some issues. Below you will find a few tips for making the seed knit stitch.

  • Accidental Yarn Overs

Knitters new to the seed knit stitch often come across accidental yarn overs. This is very common. To prevent accidental yarn overs, always remember to bring the working yarn to the front of your project before purling.

  • The Stitch Looks Like Ribbing

If your seed knit stitch looks like ribbing, you are stacking your knits and purls on top of each other. To prevent this, start with an even number of stitches and start each row with the same stitch you ended the previous row. There are some patterns where you cannot do this. In these cases, it is important that you learn to recognise your stitches.

How to recognize each stitch:

Purl Stitch:

The purl stitch creates a small bump reminiscent of a purl.

Knit Stitch:

The knit stitch creates a stitch that is flat and looks like a V.

  • Starting With an Odd or Even Number of Stitches

When making the seed knit stitch, it is vital that the stitches alternate in the rows and the columns. So, when starting with an even number of stitches, start each row with the last stitch used in the previous row. When starting with an odd number of stitches, always start each row the same.

Examples:

Cast on an Even Number of Stitches

Row 1: [knit 1, purl 1], repeat to the end of the row.

Row 2: [purl 1, knit 1], repeat to the end of the row.

Repeat rows 1 and 2 until you reach the desired length.

Cast on an Odd Number of Stitches

Row 1: [knit 1, purl 1], repeat to the end of the row.

Repeat row 1 until you reach the desired length.

I hope you found my how to make the seed stitch tutorial helpful

And now that you know how to make the seed knitting stitch, it is time to get busy working on a new pattern. You can find knitting patterns on our Facebook Page.

Here’e more stitch tutorials:

Enjoy learning the seed stitch